Drumming Up Support

Drumming Up Support

Justin from Conservation Economy met with the Strings the other week and they had an interesting discussion about marketeers and the role they need to play in helping use their skills to make a positive contribution to the planet, as opposed to a negative one.

Strings was asked to post a blog on the site, which we’ve reproduced here.

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Would It Really Matter if Worms Ruled the World

Picture 38It’s interesting and quite a sombre thought when you consider that man has only really been civilised (rather ironic) for about 10,000 years, during which time we have pretty much single-handedly changed the face of the planet we inhabit, and it’s difficult to actually think what we’ve really done to improve it.

I’m not one to believe we can ever really turn the clock back, but most of our inventions, movements and changes have done little to actually enhance the planet.

Most of the time as marketeers we spend our time trying to come up with amazing insightful and creative ways to persuade consumers and ourselves that we actually need that new gadget, those ripped jeans, that slighter faster computer, that new leaner, tastier, artificially produced substitute for the natural product.

The harsh reality is that we probably make people buy things they neither need or want. The need to change is fast approaching, after which time, we won’t be able to put the brakes on, and its more than likely that Mother Nature will do it for us.

There’s is a natural ebb and flow and balance within our planet, but the thought that we as a race can continue to take and abuse the worlds resources without any real consequences is both naive and irresponsible.

But I’m not a politician and I’m not faced with those exceptionally hard short term decisions that need to be made to protect the long term future of our societies. How can an Amazonian farmer, invaded by western influences, stand by and watch the developed world take his land, and become rich and powerful from it, without him saying, I’m going to do the same.

The genie is out the bottle, but until governments and major multi-nationals are rewarded for not delivering short term gains, then I’m not sure what the answer is.

A fatalistic approach is to say it doesn’t really matter if we self-destruct and the world ends up being ruled by worms, it’s just part of the evolutionary process. It could be argued that for the past 50,000 years or so we’ve embarked on a journey of consumerism which has demonstrated we’re not worthy of being in charge.

And the reality is, would it really matter if we weren’t here. We can all become wrapped up in our own self-importance and we lose sight of the bigger picture and the fact we’re merely a very tiny line on a graph.

Here’s some perspective:-
– The first animals were c.610 m years ago
– Sharks 450 m years
– crocodiles c.200m years
– Birds 145-200m years ago
– Apes 25 m years ago
– Genus/ homo has been around 2.5m
– Homo sapiens 200,000 years (that’s us)

Along that journey animals have been and gone, and societies risen and fallen. All helping provide a building block for the next stage of our planet’s development. Maybe, that’s what we need to accept.

We’ve managed to evolve to be the leading consumer, eating up and probably destroying our planet quicker than a plague of locusts. I don’t know why as a race we’ve changed so much quicker over the past 10k years, some would argue it’s because of our intelligence, but why didn’t alligators or birds develop our levels of intelligence. Maybe they’ve already been through it once and realised it wasn’t worth it and they ate themselves out of house and home and the smart ones just stayed in the trees and rivers.

And what about the beautiful time of the dinosaurs, does it really matter that they’re extinct. Maybe, maybe not.  The fact is, we seem to only care about our race being first, at any cost. Worms ruling the world and the human race helping feed them might be something we should be worried about but only when we begin to care about sustainability and relative consumerism.

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Conservation Economy is a great platform to discuss some of the major issues we’re faced with and through this type of forum hopefully we can all do our bit to help.

But don’t worry if you’re feeling a little sad, watch this to help make you smile. Make sure you get past 2.30.

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